Film Makers for Conservation

Wow, Oceans Project Georgia just got a very nice mention in the news section of ‘Film Makers for Conservation’.  In case you haven’t heard of them before, and don’t know why we are so excited to get a mention, here is a little bit about them:

Filmmakers For Conservation is a global community of passionate people who work in, or have an association with, the global film and television industry. The organisation was born almost a decade ago out of a growing sense of frustration among many producers and directors that there was very little funding and airtime being made available for films that dealt with conservation and the environment.

In 1999 at the Jackson Hole Film Festival, in the US state of Wyoming, about one-hundred and twenty of the conference delegates met and held lively discussions on the issue of conservation in film. The first step towards FFC was taken – a list-serve for all of those with a mind for the environment.

Discussions on the goals and plans for FFC continued at the International Wildlife Film Festival in Missoula, Montana the following April and at the Wildscreen Film Festival in Bristol in the UK in October of the same year.

To the inspiration of those who had been instrumental in the first Jackson Hole meeting large numbers attended and the continued lively discussion proved there was a lot of interest in forming an organisation such as FFC. In the following twelve months Filmmakers For Conservation grew from a list-serve to a fully fledged non-profit organisation focussed on ‘using the power of film and media to save our natural world’.

Critical to this goal is to reach news audiences inspiring, educating and motivating people to actively participate in, and support, conservation. Also important is the network that has been established. Like-minded filmmakers have been able to spread new and innovative ‘green’ ideas, build lasting relationships with peers all over the globe and support one another in spreading the conservation message.

Essential to the success of FFC are its members and supporters. In the organisations near ten year history membership has grown to several hundred and the diversity of those involved has expanded greatly to include those working in online video and other areas of ‘new media’.

I hope you understand why we are so excited now!  If you get a chance, then please check us out on their news page: http://www.filmmakersforconservation.org/news-events.html

And if you are really feeling inspired and support what we are doing here in the Caucasus, then please, please, please help us between now and the 3rd May to raise the money we urgently need to send our young people on expedition with Earthwatch this summer, so they can do some hands on conservation work and inspire others through their film making.  http://www.crowdfunder.co.uk/investment/oceans-project-georgia-647

Here is the video made by our young Oceans Ambassadors about their dream to go to Belize to help Earthwatch to conserve sharks:

Even if you can’t help us financially, then please share the links with others and spread the word about our dreams as the more people who know about us, the more chance we have of finding a sponsor.  Thanks a million xxx

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Oceans-Project-Georgia/233653316691866

www.oceansproject.com

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About Sarah Rows Solo

British YouTuber and Founder of Environmental and STEM education charity Oceans Project, preparing for a solo row around the coast of Great Britain.
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One Response to Film Makers for Conservation

  1. Reblogged this on oceansproject and commented:
    We are very lucky Ambassadors indeed!

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